At What Price Peace; or, Coming Home to Roost with Coffee and Croissants [a Short Story]

  At What Price Peace? The State in America only pays lip service to the exercise of freedom. Presidents in the State of the Union rarely ever serve more than their image. The State was incapable of respecting in the least the kind of freedom he had once believed was his birth right. I cannot … Continue reading At What Price Peace; or, Coming Home to Roost with Coffee and Croissants [a Short Story]

Where Have All the Good Readers Gone? [a Short Story]

I Where have all the good readers gone? I would like to ask this question openly, but do not have the courage to ask this question, by thus doing I would challenge too many of the grossly absurd assumptions of too many of my colleagues who I respect in spite of what I know to … Continue reading Where Have All the Good Readers Gone? [a Short Story]

The Days of the French Revolution Have Been Forgotten [Short Fiction]

Prologue It is a mistake to say that the Reign of Terror saved France, or so it has been said by many, and to which I can only agree. The Terror certainly destroyed the revolution. Only the insane or the most savage satirist can say the guillotine was an instrument in the installation of democracy. … Continue reading The Days of the French Revolution Have Been Forgotten [Short Fiction]

Consensus, Non-Sensus; the Monologic Voice Among Other Voices [A Short-short Story]

Prefatory Remarks We are all too keen on looking for any reason we live in the political shit we live in--any reason but the one that would point to our complicity in the mess we have made of our politics. Complicity is difficult to take; you only have to look at any divorce at any … Continue reading Consensus, Non-Sensus; the Monologic Voice Among Other Voices [A Short-short Story]

A Letter Concerning Political Understanding by an Anonymous Author [Short Fiction]

Here is a letter by an unnamed author. The manuscript was found on the steps of the Harvard Library one early spring, a sunny, yet chilly day in Cambridge. It is presented here in its entirety, and not knowing what genre it was originally intended for, I have assumed that of the philosophical letter--there were … Continue reading A Letter Concerning Political Understanding by an Anonymous Author [Short Fiction]

Media Body Snatching [A Short Story]

A fictional essay is just that, an essay in form, but fictional in as much as it is the mouthpiece of the essayer. Just as we do not confuse author and narrator, not unless we want to grossly abuse the critical process--we do not confuse the author with the expositor of the essay. Please be … Continue reading Media Body Snatching [A Short Story]

Sawing the Air [A Short-short Story]

Diatribe, invective, rant, tirade, polemic; no two words are completely synonymous; no two words are interchangeable in every context of use . . . usage. A forceful and bitter verbal attack, a diatribe; a long and angry speech of criticism or accusation, a tirade; to speak long and loud in a wild, impassioned manner, to … Continue reading Sawing the Air [A Short-short Story]

An American Polemicist Speaks [Short Fiction]

In the course of our contemporary human events, a man speaks of politics American . .. What shall not perish? A question begets yet other questions. What then should I ask? A government of the elite, by the elite and for the elite? Is this what we have? Of course it is what we have. Do … Continue reading An American Polemicist Speaks [Short Fiction]

When the Soul is a Chariot [a short-story]

I could not take my eyes off it at the Met. There have been many paintings I could not take my eyes off of, but this one, so large, tremendous, I recall having said as I walked into the gallery where it was hanging, Caravaggio's La Deposizione, Christ being placed in his tomb, the two … Continue reading When the Soul is a Chariot [a short-story]

Monkeys and Men [Flash Fiction]

"I came across an observation made in a pocket journal I used to carry--it was last year, last June, past midway, approaching the summer solstice. I must have ben eating sushi, where I do not know . . . sushi chefs talking crazy talk to my ears not understanding Chinese. What is it about languages we do … Continue reading Monkeys and Men [Flash Fiction]

In Itself is Always For Itself, Whether By Itself or Not; a fictional essay

  The political and the literary are each distinct ways of seeing the world. Each is a unique means of understanding the limits of Truth (yes, upper case necessary). Both are ways of adjusting the focus on the lenses we use to recognize and to identify people, places and things in the world, ordering that … Continue reading In Itself is Always For Itself, Whether By Itself or Not; a fictional essay

Through the Glass Darkly [Flash Fiction]

All is through the glass darkly . . . and so the New York Yankees a soccer team by my say so aside, the political state metaphysically opposes the religious at every turn. It has so since the Renaissance. The birth of the modern world was the death of the medieval ecclesiastical. America's hostility to … Continue reading Through the Glass Darkly [Flash Fiction]

Gay Marriage IV

Part V, next week, Tuesday, March 8, 2016. IV The acceptance of Gay Marriage will change how the traditional role of woman in marriage has been and continues to be defined against her personhood. Nothing as archaically constituted as traditional marriage should have endured for as long as it has without addressing the way marriage … Continue reading Gay Marriage IV

Where Have All the Greetings Gone? [Flash Fiction]

The past is not past. What does that mean? Of course, it is past, just as remembering the past is present. So, remembering the past is not past. Does this mean that what I remember is the past--I can only use the material of the past in memory and call it remembering, no? So then, … Continue reading Where Have All the Greetings Gone? [Flash Fiction]

I and Thou [a Short Story]

  ONE I pray before a triptych at the Met, Ave Maria Plena Gratia, genuflecting as Gabriel before the Queen of Heaven. I remember having been told that Protestants and Jews were too materialistic--I had family who said as much at the tables we'd sit around for holiday dinners, most of them religious holidays turned … Continue reading I and Thou [a Short Story]

Frozen in Stone [Fiction]

Without question . . . I know what is meant by living stone. I understand what Goethe meant when he said architecture was music frozen in stone. I know statues and architecture are different, but how much are they really different from one another. I'm not even sure how different architecture and statuary are different … Continue reading Frozen in Stone [Fiction]

Gay Marriage; a few more notes

III The primitive ways we have understood marriage over the centuries has affected how we think of it today; how could it not. The way we have thought about many things over the last millennium that persist in our discourse affects how we think about them today. Just what the implications were for women in … Continue reading Gay Marriage; a few more notes

I is We [a Short Story]

  We have a professional military in America of a nearly incomparable size, that is, greater than almost all nations with the exceptions perhaps of China and India. This professional military, even when many are career soldiers and might presumably retire from active service without entering the job market, is a feeder trainer of many … Continue reading I is We [a Short Story]

Gay Marriage II

Part III, February 11, 2016 II Traditional marriage, for a long time coming, has needed a re-articulation, a re-definition. This re-definition is necessary because the institution of marriage has been stuck, as alluded to above, in an archaic understanding of men and women, and has suffered the subtractive legacies of patriarchy, and the power plays … Continue reading Gay Marriage II

What I Remember from When I was a Boy [fiction]

Another and Another and Another One. I remember my Dad reading MacBeth to me when I was a boy, one of the Folger Library editions we used to use in school, one of Julius Caesar we used in 7th grade. I was maybe 7 when my Dad read MacBeth to me. I remember noting that … Continue reading What I Remember from When I was a Boy [fiction]

The Barbarian Invasions [Flash Fiction]

I loved L'Acajou--it's not there anymore as my mother is not here anymore, as the past is not here anymore, and what was past is past never present, and what we remember is not past but now, contemporary. Shall the twain ever meet. I held her hand until her heart stopped beating, my mother. She … Continue reading The Barbarian Invasions [Flash Fiction]

Cave Dwellers, All [Flash Fiction]

Grotesque Comes from Grotto Meaning Cave Where We Come From or the Cave in Which We Dwell   My opposition to how political correctness has mismanaged the defense of the rights it has purported to be an advocate for is not in line with Donald Trump's "Know-nothing" populism. Re-examine the Know-nothing Party of the mid-nineteenth … Continue reading Cave Dwellers, All [Flash Fiction]

A More Perfect Union [A Short Story]

A short-short Story in a monologic voice; or, as, we might say, the essayistic voice, I have grown accustomed to wearing--and we do wear voices as we also wear masks, persons, personality, maskality, what is it about personality and the selves of the Self?  What we have here are some of the opinions of Thomas … Continue reading A More Perfect Union [A Short Story]

Looking for Patti Smith; or, Gay Marriage is a Human Rights Issue [A Short-short Story]

  An essay found on a chair in a cafe in New York, waiting, as the man was, to see if he would see Patti Smith come in to have coffee and brown bread as she describes in her latest memoir that he bought in hardcover recently to read. He has followed her for many … Continue reading Looking for Patti Smith; or, Gay Marriage is a Human Rights Issue [A Short-short Story]