Notes on Reading

All good reading is re-reading. --something I used to say to my freshman composition classes when I was an adjunct with CUNY at several colleges   I am preparing a return to a nearly long delayed re-read of Sterne's Tristram Shandy. That is my current narrative prose fiction. I am also planning a return trek through … Continue reading Notes on Reading

A Representation of the Human

Prefatory Remarks 'A' and 'the' are more than determiners, what we in English call the indefinite and definite articles . . . both of them are morphemes, smaller units of meaning as would be the -ly suffix in English, a derivational morpheme changing, for instance, the adjective 'true' to the adverb, 'truly.' An inquiry is … Continue reading A Representation of the Human

Baudelaire On The Flowers of Evil

"You know that I have always considered that literature and the arts pursue an aim independent of morality. Beauty of conception and style is enough for me. But this book, whose title (Fleurs du mal) says everything, is clad, as you will see, in a cold and sinister beauty. It was created with rage and … Continue reading Baudelaire On The Flowers of Evil

Woolf and Craftsmanship

Words, English words, are full of echoes, of memories, of associations—naturally. They have been out and about, on people’s lips, in their houses, in the streets, in the fields, for so many centuries. And that is one of the chief difficulties in writing them today—that they are so stored with meanings, with memories, that they … Continue reading Woolf and Craftsmanship

Flaneuse Oblique; Va. Woolf and Advice to a Young Poet

[S]ummon all your courage, exert all your vigilance, invoke all the gifts that Nature has been induced to bestow. Then let your rhythmical sense wind itself in and out among men and women, omnibuses, sparrows—whatever come along the street—until it has strung them together in one harmonious whole. That perhaps is [the writer’s] task—to find … Continue reading Flaneuse Oblique; Va. Woolf and Advice to a Young Poet

THE FALLING LEAF REVIEW is now a Semi-annual on the Solstices

The Falling Leaf Review, published on ISSUU.COM/thefallingleafreview has shifted its publication schedule. It is currently a Semi-annual published each Solstice. Look for it in the upcoming week. It is still a literary review with fiction, essays, poetry, commentary, photos and art. Publishing and Contributing Editor, Jay V. Ruvolo.

Cultural Cholesterol [short fiction]

Why would any critic worth his intelligence, his aptitude, his acumen, want to belong to a school of criticism that would have him as one of its shining star members? How you receive personal criticism from another, let us say, a friend, or a colleague, perhaps a supervisor--this latter one you must always be wary … Continue reading Cultural Cholesterol [short fiction]

LAND’S END, POEMS, by Jay Ruvolo

Paperback Book Details ISBN 9781939739889 90 pages $14.00 Poetry. Land's End is not only the end of land at the edge of the sea, but the brink of everything we stand on. It is a precipice, an opening of the abyss; it is everything primordial in living, thinking, remembering. Land's End is a first book … Continue reading LAND’S END, POEMS, by Jay Ruvolo

Cross Dressing Genre [Short Fiction]

What would it mean or could it mean, if I were to present this text as an excerpt taken from among papers found in a briefcase without identification, without any evidence by which we could ascribe authorship--thus the writer would remain unknown, except to those who insist they can tell gender by diction, by syntax, by … Continue reading Cross Dressing Genre [Short Fiction]

Dark Box, Dark Room [short fiction]

From the papers found on the desk of Thomas Sarebbononato by his nephew a week or more after the former's funeral during a summer when a lot of rain fell. [a fragment] The past is not past--should this be interrogative or declarative? Yet, by now or by then? Up until what? No! Moreover--of course! As a further … Continue reading Dark Box, Dark Room [short fiction]